Volk von Bauhaus

By Manuel

Ascended (18715)

Manuel's picture

31-12-2011, 22:31

Ever seen this? Ikeda-san pointed me to it...

http://www.discogs.com/Takashi-Kokubo-Digital-Soundology-1-V...

It's an LP containing an MSX program...

This guy, Takashi Kokubo, used (amongst others) 3 Yamaha CX5's to create his music in his Kokubox Digital Soundology System. Also a Fairlight CMI, PPG Wave 2.3 and a Yamaha DX7. For software he used at least the YRM-11 (Music Macro) on his MSX's.

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By gingerbeardman

Resident (39)

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22-01-2022, 20:31

Audio is below: did somebody convert this to a file already?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04uN9pS4t3A

By sdsnatcher73

Prophet (2995)

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23-01-2022, 10:26

Here is the WAV and the TSX. You need to run it on a Yamaha CX-5F with YRM-11 or YRM-104 in the slot. Load the program with CLOAD.
The album is available on Bandcamp.

By Manuel

Ascended (18715)

Manuel's picture

23-01-2022, 22:24

OK, I tried it, but... it generates random music? WTF?

By sdsnatcher73

Prophet (2995)

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24-01-2022, 04:33

Yeah cool, right? You enter some numbers (seeds for the generator I reckon but can’t read the Japanese) and it starts playing notes (objectively that is what it is doing, calling it music is subjective Wink)

By gingerbeardman

Resident (39)

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24-01-2022, 15:09

Nice! Thanks for the insight and going to the effort of converting it.

By gingerbeardman

Resident (39)

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24-01-2022, 21:16

Reading into this a little more.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/culture/2020/07/02/music/takash...

Quote:

Kokubo’s desire to create music that was neither overly composed, nor had any particular strong message to put across, was realized when he first laid hands on a Fairlight CMI (Computer Musical Instrument). The A-side to the album consists of two-bar repetitions enabled by this “new tool,” as Kokubo puts it.

“I wanted to make music the same way that Picasso paints.”

There are snippets of birdsong, a resonant cavalcade of marimba and breathy pads in a gleaming zoetrope of sound that whirls endlessly in ‘Playing Among the Gods,’ whereas ‘Melancholy II’ transforms the atmosphere into something swamp-like and haunted, a slow, twilit march that feels like embryonic video game music.

These loops, alongside A-side closer — the aptly named ‘Before You Dream,’ which is a sea of glitter ebbing and flowing on a cloud beach of soft, simple melody — are the most legible tracks on the album. The B-side are instead what Kokubo calls “fractionations,” beginning with the cosmic anti-sonata of ‘Fluctuation #1’ with its random, puffy beat.

“They’re all composed by an automatic computer-playing program,” he says. “I’m just changing some autoplay parameters from song to song. So I didn’t make it because I wanted to create sharpness.

“It just happened.”